Candy

Bio

In pushing the limits of standard chaos, Candy has been a transitory force within the hardcore music scene since their debut in March of 2017. Refusing to adhere to the paradigms and principles of hardcore, punk, metal, pop, or whatever label the listener has tried to affix onto them; they’ve created a space all their own.

With their Triple B Records debut Candy Says in the fall of 2017, listeners were violently ushered into Candy’s own dystopian soundscape. Synthesizing influences from punk and hardcore from across the globe such as Bastard, Discharge, Cro-Mags, and Integrity; the group demonstrated their ability to match the energy of their inspirators while creating an experience vehemently theirs’s. From the deep guttural cry of vocalist Zak Quiram on “Love Wants More Love” to Michael Quick’s contemplative guitar work on the title track “Candy Says”, we see all the working parts of a band hell bent on warping the reality of its listener. The use of shimmery chorus effects over down-tuned guitars only works to further affirm the sweet/grotesque dichotomy of Candy’s brand.

Over the course of a year and some change, with a handful of live appearances, Candy has rendered the performatory aspects of their art down to a science. Playing to increasingly larger and larger audiences, they are able to create a unique atmosphere each and every show that leaves the crowd equal parts satisfied and hungry for more.

Now, Candy has once again teamed up with Triple B Records for their most fantastical and sinister release yet. Keeping in line with the artistic dualities of pleasure and pain, fact and fiction, peace and violence, their debut LP Good to Feel delivers 9 songs of their most ambitious and focused material to date. Aligning with the esteemed engineer and producer Arthur Rizk, Candy has finally achieved the type of artistry that transcends the confines of its own medium. Where they once dabbled in the marriage of noise and image, Good to Feel succeeds in its pull from deep cinematic wells. Utilizing the atmosphere of films such as Escape from New York and Akira, Candy’s new record grants the listener a psychotic joyride into a world one misstep away from absolute obliteration. Environmental devastation, police violence, political corruption, and a myriad of tragedies privy to the human experience all make their way into the vaudeville demonstration that is Good to Feel.